Just Show Up – Just Do What You Said You Would Do!

Just Show Up – Just Do What You Said You Would Do!

I was soliciting estimates to have an area paved. I called several contractors and many scheduled times and did not show. Several showed but did not provide an estimate. Several were late. Several seemed uninterested when they were there. Others wanted me to feel like they were doing me a favor by showing up. Of the estimates I received one was 90% higher than all the rest (and he was the one I wanted to do the work).

Because of the confusion and the differences in price, I went online and found an estimating piece of software and put the numbers in to see what I might expect to pay. The software came up with a specific price. This was interesting because two of the companies were within $200 of this estimate. The one I selected made some valuable suggestions (like draining the roof run off under the concrete to avoid ice buildup during the winter.) He was the only one who suggested this. But the reason I selected him was because he showed up, demonstrated his knowledge and experience with the suggestion of running drains under the concrete and he listened.

My wife has her list of things she wants to do during her life. One is to drive some heavy equipment. I mentioned this to some of the contractors who took the time to ask me some questions. Some thought it was cute, some thought it was a great idea and others did not give me time to ask the question. They measured the area and left. When I mentioned this to the company I selected, he made a wonderful suggestion to make the experience more valuable to my wife. That told me he not only embraced the idea but wanted to help me made my wife’s request come true.

Here is the lessons learned when you are on a sales call:

1. Show up when you say you will be there. Being late is a sign of disrespect. You are saying my time is not important.

2. Do what you said you would do. Provide and estimate or at least tell me you are not interested. Don’t tell me you will provide an estimate and then not do that. I have decision to make and my time is valuable.

3. Demonstrate your knowledge by the questions you ask not by talking at me and telling me stuff I really don’t need or want to know. Respect my time. If you must tell me at least tell me why it is important to the decision-making process.

4. Listen to the prospect. You do not know why people are doing what they are doing. Make them feel important because you asked questions and listened. I believe, all things being equal, this is the most important.

5. This applies to all business owners not just construction personal and estimators I can tell you when this concrete provider is finished, I will be very happy to recommend him to others and do what I can to help him grow his business.

Business Growth Facilitator

Ron Finklestein

330-990-0788

Ron @ businessgrowthfaciltator.com

Ron Finklestein is an accomplished Sales Training Coach and Consultant for small businesses. Professional and public speaker. International business author.

About Ron Finklestein

Ron Finklestein is an accomplished Sales Training Coach and Consultant for small businesses. Professional and public speaker. International business author.

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